CURATORIAL TEAM — S.T.A.F.F.

 

S.T.A.F.F. is an international curatorial team of five women who are pursuing Master's degrees in Critical and Curatorial Studies of Contemporary Art at National Taipei University of Education in Taipei, Taiwan.

S.T.A.F.F. is comprised of Shormi Ahmed, Tatiana Syromiatnikova, Ariana Lombardi, Zilin (Franky) Gong, and E-fahn (Fawn) Wang.

Shormi Ahmed is a Bangladeshi-born art practitioner from Hong Kong. She was Head of Arts at Duddell’s Hong Kong and has executed several public art projects including Carnival, a fundraiser for Amnesty International HK, and Art in the Bar for CoBo Social. She holds a diploma in Industrial Design and has earned her undergraduate degree in Fine Arts and Comparative Literature from the University of Hong Kong. During her studies at NTUE, Shormi is keen on exploring recent curatorial methodologies in representing regional and post-colonial history. She is also interested in cross-cultural projects between South, Southeast, and East Asia. As an art practitioner, Shormi strives to make contemporary art accessible to a wider demographic.
 

Tatiana Syromiatnikova was born and raised in Yakutsk, Russia. Her ethnicity is Sakha an indigenous people of the Russian Far East. After getting two degrees in Finance and Law, she pursued a career in the banking industry. However, she has always seen her future in the art-related field, so in 2018 she decided to change her career path. She volunteers as a multilingual tour guide for international visitors at the National Taiwan Museum in Taipei. Her MA research focuses on curating Contemporary Indigenous Art from Taiwan and explores the struggle between the revival of the traditional culture and the adaptation for contemporary art narratives. Related to this interest, she wants to contribute to a social change in the modern representation of indigenous communities.

Ariana Lombardi is a writer, performer, artist, and teacher. She founded The Salon, a collaborative and interdisciplinary platform for artists and performance, and she has hosted salons in Taipei, Taiwan; Guangzhou, China; and several cities across the United States. She earned her BA in Creative Writing in Santa Fe. Her current research at NTUE is concerned with space, innovative approaches to museum education, and performance art and performativity. Her writing has been published in That’sPRD,  KNACK Magazine, The Laurel Review, and Glyph. She uses language and writing as a directive and method in her work - whether it is performance or facilitating art collaborations and projects. Her most recent explorations are concerned with the body, the shape of sound, space, and the physicality of language. 

Zilin (Franky) Gong is from Shanghai, China. She completed her Bachelor’s degree at Providence University, Taichung. During her undergraduate years, she developed a better understanding of Taiwan and widened her horizons by reflecting on problems through various perspectives. Her fascination with art initially evolved from a deep-rooted interest in painting. She has been drawing since childhood, which inspired her to pursue fine arts painting training in junior high. She is currently studying for a Master's degree to enhance her insights into curatorial studies. She finds delight in film and video art, and she hopes to do more explorations about eliminating the boundary between film and contemporary art. Recently, she has also been researching "low art" and Shanzhai (knock-off/fake) culture in Mainland China. 

E-fahn (Fawn) Wang is an independent arts writer, editor, and translator from the United States. After earning her Bachelor’s degree in Art History and Business, she moved to Taipei to pursue a Master’s degree in Contemporary Art Curation and Critique. Her research interests involve the macabre and the grotesque in contemporary East Asian art, specifically how manifestations of horror can serve as expressions of identity crises on individual, cultural, and global bases. She is also investigating how phenomena such as secularization, globalization, and digitization are complicating notions of identity in the Information Age.

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